Imperial Rome

Imperial Rome Not to know what happened before we were born wrote Cicero is to remain perpetually a child For what is the worth of a human life unless it is woven into the life of our ancesters by the records of h

  • Title: Imperial Rome
  • Author: Moses Hadas
  • ISBN: 9780622436302
  • Page: 197
  • Format: cloth
  • Not to know what happened before we were born wrote Cicero, is to remain perpetually a child For what is the worth of a human life unless it is woven into the life of our ancesters by the records of history In these volumes on The Great Ages of Man an honored place is rightfully given to Rome, which emphasized so greatly the importance of history and tradition.

    • READ AUDIOBOOK æ Imperial Rome - by Moses Hadas
      Moses Hadas

    About Author

    1. Moses Hadas 1900 1966 was an American teacher, one of the leading classical scholars of the twentieth century, and a translator of numerous works.Raised in Atlanta in a Yiddish speaking Orthodox Jewish household, his early studies included rabbinical training he graduated from Jewish Theological Seminary of America 1926 and took his doctorate in classics in 1930 He was fluent in Yiddish, German, ancient Hebrew, ancient Greek, Latin, French, and Italian, and well versed in other languages.His most productive years were spent at Columbia University, where he was a colleague of Jacques Barzun and Lionel Trilling There, he took his talent for languages, combined it with a popularizing impulse, to buck the prevailing classical methods of the day textual criticism and grammar presenting classics, even in translation, as worthy of study as literary works in their own right.This approach may be compared to the New Criticism school even as the New Critics emphasized close reading, eschewing outside sources and cumbersome apparatus, Hadas, in presenting classical works in translation to an influx of post war G.I Bill students, brought forth an appreciation of his domain for those without the specialized training of classicists.His popularizing impulse led him to embrace television as a tool for education, becoming a telelecturer and a pundit on broadcast television He also recorded classical works on phonograph and tape.

    One thought on “Imperial Rome

    1. Another fine entry in the Time Life Great Ages of Man series, which is much better than it has any right to be Great use of art, engaging prose by Hadas, and a nice blend of classical reference and modern anthropological insight.


    2. It was a great, short overview Was very interesting reading about the end of the Republic and Caesar and Pompey in broader strokes, after having listened to the Hardcore History version of events.


    3. I must admit I never read history books, but as an art reference I look at the pictures This book could use pictures, yet as a focus on a certain period it contains than enough samples of art and architecture of the era to serve as a good reference to art the period.


    4. If you want to read something about the grandeur that was Rome, read this book It is not too long nor is it too short It does not bore you with the immaterial But gives you just about the right amount of information for you to have a clear picture of imperial Rome.






    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *