Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals

Stubborn Attachments A Vision for a Society of Free Prosperous and Responsible Individuals None

  • Title: Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals
  • Author: Tyler Cowen
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 280
  • Format: ebook
  • None

    • [AZW] ✓ Free Read ↠ Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals : by Tyler Cowen Ù
      Tyler Cowen

    About Author

    1. Tyler Cowen born January 21, 1962 occupies the Holbert C Harris Chair of economics as a professor at George Mason University and is co author, with Alex Tabarrok, of the popular economics blog Marginal Revolution He currently writes the Economic Scene column for the New York Times and writes for such magazines as The New Republic and The Wilson Quarterly.Cowen s primary research interest is the economics of culture He has written books on fame What Price Fame , art In Praise of Commercial Culture , and cultural trade Creative Destruction How Globalization is Changing the World s Cultures In Markets and Cultural Voices, he relays how globalization is changing the world of three Mexican amate painters Cowen argues that free markets change culture for the better, allowing them to evolve into something people want Other books include Public Goods and Market Failures, The Theory of Market Failure, Explorations in the New Monetary Economics, Risk and Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and New Theories of Market Failure.

    One thought on “Stubborn Attachments: A Vision for a Society of Free, Prosperous, and Responsible Individuals



    1. All authors should write a philosophical treatise like this to give the rest of their work a proper foundation Since they don t, I m left with just this one and a few others And Tyler Cowen s is densely packed with insight than perhaps any other document I ve read, addressing questions like How should you weight the well being of future people compared to present ones How should you wander through the epistemic fog that makes it exceedingly difficult to know the effects of your actions Does hap [...]


    2. How do we decide what is right in a world full of contradictory ideologies and ethical frameworks Cowen s answer is both laughably obvious and deeply subversive the overriding ethical principle is to maximize sustainable economic growth.Sustained economic growth provides a solution to aggregation problems disagreements about how to aggregate value across individuals, how to distribute resources and arrange society because sustained growth means almost all of us get of what we want, in the long [...]


    3. Good, but a serious study of Parfit or perhaps JS Mill may give readers a deeper perspective Dig into Cowen s bibliography and, as Cowen suggests, be humble with your views.Try reading interactively at medium stubborn attachments


    4. This short book really an extended essay that you can find and read for free on Medium is by far the best extended argument I ve read for the morality of pursuing economic growth before almost any other value other than fundamental human rights.



    5. While i do agree with the central tenet of the book that society should maximize growth in many ways the book is too abstract for my taste.


    6. What a great, fun and quick read I agree with nearly every word Tyler writes.My only criticism is that I wish Tyler touched upon the propensity for humans to define their preferences by relative values instead than objective ones aka why growth doesn t automatically make humans happy , and how this intersects with automation, the larger range of and discrepancy in future incomes.


    7. Inchoate thoughts about government and society from my favorite economist This work in progress was a throw in as an incentive for pre ordering his new book, which is out in February Always interesting, if not quite yet coherent.


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